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Posts tagged education

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blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

Book Series: Ruby and the Booker Boys

Author: Derrick Barnes

Ruby and the Booker Boys, one of Derrick Barnes’ most successful preteen series captures the essence of just being a kid in a community.  A place where everyone acts like family regardless of their family tree.  Children of all ages, and yes I’m included, are immediately captivated by her play on words and witty way of outsmarting anyone that stands in her way.  It’s easy for any reader to forget that Ruby is this pretty, brown-skinned trendsetter, because you literally take on her role and become the queen of the scene!

Books:

Brand New School, Brave New Ruby

Trivia Queen, 3rd Grade Supreme

Slumber Party Payback

Ruby Flips for Attention

(Source: chicagonow.com, via stopwhitewashing)

Filed under Ruby and the Brooker Boys Derrick Barnes education books childrens books

26,779 notes

awkwardsituationist:

  • globally, 77,600,000 girls do not attend school
  • there are 33,000,000 fewer girls than boys in primary education
  • girls with secondary education are 6 times less likely to be married as children
  • a girl with 7 years of schooling in the developing world will have 2.2 fewer children
  • a child born to a literate mother is 50% more likely to survive past the age of 5
  • two thirds of the 775,000,000 illiterate adults, and 63% of illiterate youth, are female
  • literate mothers are twice as likely to immunize their and send them children to school
  • a girl who completes basic education is 3 times less likely to contract HIV
  • a girl earns 20% more as an adult for every additional year of education she receives
  • a nation’s GDP rises an average of 3% when 10% more its girls attend school
  • less than 2% of international development funds are specifically allocated to girls
  • school is not free in over 50 countries

sources

photos: (1) malala yousafzai; (2) joey l. of a school for the hamar tribe in ethiopia; (3) beawiharta in jakarta of students who risk life crossing a collpased bridge to get to school; (4) muhammed muheisen, pakistan; (5) altaf gadri of an unofficial school run for slum dwellers held under a bridge; (6) paula bronstein of burmese refugees in thailand at a school in their refugee camp; (7) noah seelam, hyderabad, india; (8) per anders pettersson, uganda; (9) lana slezic in afghanistan; (10) roberto schmidt in afghanistan, where acid attacks and poisoning of school water by the taliban is on the increase

(via gtfothinspo)

Filed under school education girls in education feminism

8,222 notes

We often hear about U.S. teachers being paid poorly for all the work they do to educate children. But did you know that 63 percent of teachers report buying food for the classroom each month with their own money?

More Than Half Of Teachers Report Buying Hungry Students Food With Their Own Money

I know at my mom’s school, teachers worked with parents to make sure children had food, clothes, school supplies, medical care. Kids who didn’t have running water in their homes (no, I’m not kidding) were given access to the showers in the gym and teachers would do their laundry. Teachers drove families who didn’t have cars to their doctor and dentist appointments, allowed kids in extracurriculars who needed to be at school early to go to band contests or football and baseball games to stay at their house overnight so they could drive the kids in early the next day. At Christmas, teachers pooled resources to help parents get together Christmas presents and dinners, so kids could have Christmas meals. My mom, an elementary school principal, drove her former students in high school to distant colleges so they could see campuses they couldn’t visit otherwise and helped them with college and financial aid applications. My parents gave families, free of charge, a car, a washer and dryer, musical instruments my brother and I no longer used, and they weren’t the only teachers or other parents in the community who did the same for kids and families in need.

I know there are bad teachers, but my experience being raised by an educator and being surrounded by teachers was that teachers love their students and want what is best for their students. They will do whatever they can for kids and their families if they think it will help the kids succeed. The teachers in my life were overwhelmingly examples of dogged, selfless dedication. I know so many teachers now who have worked well past when they could retire because they still love teaching, because they love the kids, because they want to make the world a better place.

Teachers are amazing people, and instead of discrediting them, blaming them for all the problems with our education system, and replacing them with less expensive and less qualified people who will be in and out of the profession in a couple of years, we should be doing our best to seek out and support the people who have this kind of passion and commitment to the hard work of educating children. 

What this should also tell us is just how many kids are going hungry right now, and how vitally important it is that we continue to invest in children. SNAP benefits, Medicaid, subsidized housing…all of these things are vitally important to school success. A child can’t do well in school if they are hungry, sick, and homeless or worried about becoming homeless, and you’d be hard pressed to find teachers who have never encountered students who have dealt with one or all of these challenges, except maybe in the wealthiest school districts. Taking care of kids should be one of our biggest priorities, and sadly, it’s turned into some sort of political game to see who can be the most committed to poverty shaming and anti-government, no matter who is hurt in the process. It’s sickening.

Education is important. Children are everything. We need to invest more into both. Now I’ll get off my soap box.

(via robot-heart-politics)

You know how school cafeterias would make kids throw away their ordered lunches if they didn’t have money on their account or whatever?  I’ve seen that happen, and I’m talking within middle/upper-class white suburban town with a school with *good ratings* that’s supposed to be *supportive* of kids and not pull stuff like this. I also know teachers who’ve bought kids lunch.

(via themindislimitless)

(via petitsirena)

Filed under education teachers union

785,562 notes

youngeducatedandhighlyirritated:

lunatickingtimebomb:

candylandcunt:

aunt-flow:

inunchartedwaters:

amplifytheworld:

referencesforartists:

brenanf999:

dontwantyourmoneysir:

anndruyan:

This is a summary of college only using two pictures; expensive as hell.

That’s my Sociology “book”. In fact what it is is a piece of paper with codes written on it to allow me to access an electronic version of a book. I was told by my professor that I could not buy any other paperback version, or use another code, so I was left with no option other than buying a piece of paper for over $200. Best part about all this is my professor wrote the books; there’s something hilariously sadistic about that. So I pretty much doled out $200 for a current edition of an online textbook that is no different than an older, paperback edition of the same book for $5; yeah, I checked. My mistake for listening to my professor.

This is why we download. 

Spreading this shit like nutella because goddamn textbooks are so expensive. 

not necessarily art related but as someone who couldn’t afford their textbooks this semester this is a godsend

REBLOGGING because after a little digging, I found my $200 textbook for free in PDF form.

friendly reminder that this exists since I know we’re all going back to college soon

signal boost

Will need this for school

Why the fuck was i not aware of this when i was actually in school

Textbooks

(Source: hal-ya, via fatgirlopinions)

Filed under education free textbooks

4,294 notes

allthingsblackwomen:

Great Lakes resident about to get her bachelor’s degree at 14 
By Conor Morris
Thessalonika Arzu-Embry and her mother, Wonder Embry, get up at 5 in the morning most weekdays to go to school together.
Unlike most 14-year-olds, however, Thessalonika isn’t off early in the morning to the local high school. She’s going to Chicago State University.
Thessalonika is putting the finishing touches on a college career that started three years ago at College of Lake County and will end next month with a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Chicago State. [Continue reading.]

allthingsblackwomen:

Great Lakes resident about to get her bachelor’s degree at 14 

By Conor Morris

Thessalonika Arzu-Embry and her mother, Wonder Embry, get up at 5 in the morning most weekdays to go to school together.

Unlike most 14-year-olds, however, Thessalonika isn’t off early in the morning to the local high school. She’s going to Chicago State University.

Thessalonika is putting the finishing touches on a college career that started three years ago at College of Lake County and will end next month with a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Chicago State. [Continue reading.]

(Source: eternallybeautifullyblack, via misandryismagical-deactivated20)

Filed under WoC feminism education higher education

125 notes

Calif. lawmakers pass K-12 transgender-rights bill

California lawmakers approved a bill Wednesday that would require public K-12 schools to let transgender students choose which restrooms they use and which school teams they join based on their gender identity instead of their chromosomes.

Existing state law already prohibits California schools from discriminating against students based on their gender identity, but the legislation that passed the state Senate on Wednesday spells that out in more detail, said Carlos Alcala, a spokesman for the bill’s author, Democratic Assemblyman Tom Ammiano of San Francisco.

At least one other state education department, in Massachusetts, has a policy granting the same protections.

(Source: neutrois, via saltysojourn)

Filed under trans* transgender education California

5,847 notes

hrtbps:

In 2004, 84-year-old Kenyan Kimani Ng’ang’a Maruge became the oldest primary school pupil in the world.  He said that the government’s announcement of universal and free elementary education in 2003 prompted him to enroll.  A year later, he was elected head boy of his school.
In September 2005, Maruge boarded a plane for the first time in his life, and headed to New York City to address the UN Millennium Development Summit on the importance of free primary education. (via)

THIS IS INSPIRATION!!!

hrtbps:

In 2004, 84-year-old Kenyan Kimani Ng’ang’a Maruge became the oldest primary school pupil in the world.  He said that the government’s announcement of universal and free elementary education in 2003 prompted him to enroll.  A year later, he was elected head boy of his school.

In September 2005, Maruge boarded a plane for the first time in his life, and headed to New York City to address the UN Millennium Development Summit on the importance of free primary education. (via)

THIS IS INSPIRATION!!!

Filed under xs awesome and inspiring people kenya education news africa